• About Dr. Dart
  • Staff
  • Therapy Protocols

Dart
Dr. Dart is a fellowship trained and board-certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in hip and pelvic surgery including joint replacement, hip arthroscopy and fracture care. In addition he specializes in fractures of the shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hip, pelvis, femur, knee, lower leg and ankle.
 
Dr. Dart is from Wichita, Kansas and obtained his medical degree and completed his residency at the University of Kansas. He returned to Wichita after completing his fellowship at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 2007. He joined the AOA practice in 2009. He was the first surgeon in Wichita to utilize the direct anterior approach for total hip replacements. He is also one of the few surgeons in the area who perform hip arthroscopies.
 
In addition to his practice Dr. Dart serves at the Director of Orthopaedic Trauma at Via Christi. He is also the Program Director of the Orthopaedic Residency Program for the KU School of Medicine in Wichita. He enjoys going to conferences, staying up to date on the latest techniques in orthopedics, teaching and ensuring our future orthopaedic surgeons are well prepared to provide quality care to their future patients.


Services:
 
Joint Replacement, Trauma, Hip
 
Subspecialties: Hip Replacement and Hip Arthroscopy
Hip and Pelvic Surgery
Orthopedic Trauma
 
Home Town:
 
Wichita, KS
 
Assistant:
 
KC Clark, APRN, FNP, BC
 
Fellowship: Orthopedic Trauma
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee
 
Residency: University of Kansas School of Medicine
Wichita, Kansas
 
Medical Degree: University of Kansas School of Medicine
Kansas City, Kansas
 
Board Certification:
 
American Board of Orthopedic Surgery
 
License:
 
Kansas Board of Healing Arts since 2004
 
Leadership Positions: Director of Orthopedic Trauma
Via Christi Health Systems
Program Director, Orthopedic Residency Program
KU School of Medicine, Wichita
 
Clinical Assistant Instructor: University of Kansas School of Medicine
Residency Training Program
 
Clinic Days: Tuesday & Friday AM

KC Clark, APRN

Advanced Practice Registered Nurse
 
KC received her Bachelors in Science of Nursing at Wichita State University in 2007. She then worked at Via Christi St. Francis in surgery while obtaining her Advanced Practice Registered Nurse degree from Wichita State University. She started working with Dr. Dart in September 2014.  She assists Dr. Dart in surgery and sees patients in clinic on Tuesdays and Friday mornings.

 

 


 

Grace Knauff, RN 

Registerd Nurse
 
Grace received her Bachelors in Science of Nursing at Wichita State University in 2008. She started working with Dr. Dart in November 2010. She assists Dr. Dart in surgery, cares for patients in clinic and also helps with office work such as surgery scheduling, patient calls and FMLA/Disability paperwork.

 


Dr. Dart works with a variety of orthopaedic injuries. The following sections are designed to assit you in your recovery.


Upper Extremity Protocols


Post Operative Treatment

You may perform gentle range of motion to the shoulder, elbow and wrist. No lifting greater than 5 pounds.

Shoulder: Bend at waist. Support weight with “good” arm on table. Gently move “bad” arm in small circles (clockwise and counter clockwise). Keep “bad” arm completely relaxed.

Elbow: Start with arm straight down by your side. Slowly bend hand towards your shoulder so your elbow bends. Bend arm up as far as you can. Slowly lower arm back down until it is straight.

Wrist: Keeping your fingers straight and your thumb extended, slowly and deliberately flex your wrist forward until you reach your end range of motion. Hold this position for one or two seconds, then extend your wrist as far back as possible. Next, keeping your fingers straight and your thumb extended, slowly and deliberately move your wrist from side to side.


Conservative Treatment

Shoulder: Bend at waist. Support weight with “good” arm on table. Gently move “bad” arm in small circles (clockwise and counter clockwise). Keep “bad” arm completely relaxed.

Elbow and wrist: If you are in a splint focus on flexing and extending your fingers.


Lower Extremity Protocols


Post Operative Treatment

Ankle:
• After surgery you will be in a post-operative splint. You will start the following exercises after your first post-operative appointment.
• Ankle Alphabet: Moving only your ankle and foot, “write” each letter of the alphabet from A to Z. Keep your leg straight. Do not bend your knee or hip. The letters will start out small and get larger as your ankle motion improves.
• Ankle pumps: Move your foot up and down as if pushing down or letting up on a gas pedal in a car.
• Ankle Circles: Make circles with your foot. Go clockwise, then repeat counter clockwise.


Knee:
• Sitting knee extensions: Sitting on a hard chair, place your hands on the seat of the chair to brace yourself. Extend one leg out in front of you and hold that position for a count of five. Then bend your knee as far as you comfortably can and hold for another five seconds. Switch legs.
• Heel Slides: Lie on your back with your legs straight. Raise one knee and place your foot flat on the floor. Slowly slide your foot towards your buttocks as far as you can without causing pain. Slide your foot back to starting position and repeat with the other leg.


Hip Protocols


Post Operative Anterior Total Hip

Gluteal Sets: Lie in bed and squeeze your buttocks muscles together as tightly as you can and hold for 5 seconds. Relax. Repeat. This exercise helps to stabilize your hip joint.

Leg lifts: Lie in bed and lift entire leg 12-18 inches off the bed. Relax. Repeat.

Ankle pumps: Move your foot up and down as if pushing down or letting up on a gas pedal in a car.

Sitting knee extensions: Sitting on a hard chair, place your hands on the seat of the chair to brace yourself. Extend one leg out in front of you and hold that position for a count of five. Then bend your knee as far as you comfortably can and hold for another five seconds. Switch legs.

Heel Slides: Lie on your back with your legs straight. Raise one knee and place your foot flat on the floor. Slowly slide your foot towards your buttocks as far as you can without causing pain. Slide your foot back to starting position and repeat with the other leg.


Post Operative Hip Fracture

Gluteal Sets: Lie in bed and squeeze your buttocks muscles together as tightly as you can and hold for 5 seconds. Relax. Repeat. This exercise helps to stabilize your hip joint.

Leg lifts: Lie in bed and lift entire leg 12-18 inches off the bed. Relax. Repeat.

Ankle pumps: Lie on back with legs straight. Flex toes towards your upper body, and then point them away in the opposite direction.

Sitting knee extensions: Sitting on a hard chair, place your hands on the seat of the chair to brace yourself. Extend one leg out in front of you and hold that position for a count of five. Then bend your knee as far as you comfortably can and hold for another five seconds. Switch legs.

Heel Slides: Lie on your back with your legs straight. Raise one knee and place your foot flat on the floor. Slowly slide your foot towards your buttocks as far as you can without causing pain. Slide your foot back to starting position and repeat with the other leg.


Conservative Hip/Pelvis Fracture

Gluteal Sets: Lie in bed and squeeze your buttocks muscles together as tightly as you can and hold for 5 seconds. Relax. Repeat. This exercise helps to stabilize your hip joint.

Leg lifts: Lie in bed and lift entire leg 12-18 inches off the bed. Relax. Repeat.

Ankle pumps: Lie on back with legs straight. Flex toes towards your upper body, and then point them away in the opposite direction.

Sitting knee extensions: Sitting on a hard chair, place your hands on the seat of the chair to brace yourself. Extend one leg out in front of you and hold that position for a count of five. Then bend your knee as far as you comfortably can and hold for another five seconds. Switch legs.

Heel Slides: Lie on your back with your legs straight. Raise one knee and place your foot flat on the floor. Slowly slide your foot towards your buttocks as far as you can without causing pain. Slide your foot back to starting position and repeat with the other leg.


Conservative Hip Pain

Hip pain can be caused by tightness in the Iliopsoas tendon. This will be assessed at your appointment. If this applies to you, you may be prescribed physical therapy. You will be given a prescription for therapy and can go to the physical therapist of your choice. It is important that you finish the full 8 weeks of therapy prior to being reassessed.